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Causation Often At The Heart Of Medical Malpractice Cases

by | May 20, 2015 | Medical Malpractice

When Baltimore residents disagree about how something happened, it can be difficult to get to the truth of the matter. This is particularly true when it is a “he-said, she-said” situation, as there may be little other proof to determine what really happened.

In other incidents, more proof may be available, such as with a personal injury case. For starters, the injured person has suffered an injury that is often apparent, either through physical effects or mental effects. The physical or mental injury may be visible to others, or it may be shown through medical records.

It still must be shown how that injury was caused, however, in order to recover damages in a negligence case. Last week, this blog discussed how an injured plaintiff must prove his or her doctor caused the injury in a medical malpractice case. This is typically accomplished by providing testimony from other doctors, who serve as expert witnesses and explain to the jury how the doctor’s medical error caused the injury at issue.

Causation can be tricky in a malpractice case, even with the help of an expert witness. Sometimes, a medical error is apparent like a surgical error that is rather obvious. In other cases, the medical error may be a misdiagnosis, where the injured person must show he or she was injured because the doctor failed to properly diagnose a condition at the time.

Our firm has significant experience in working through these difficult issues in malpractice cases. We can examine the facts of a case, review the medical records and work with a medical expert to prove how the patient was injured. For more information on our firm’s medical malpractice experience, please visit our webpage on medical malpractice.

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